Restructuring update: more schools

The chancellor is apparently now saying that he wants there to be at least 20 schools; in the latest released draft of his restructuring there were 18, including Medicine and Law. We have received word of two new schools in the works, in addition to the proposal for Computer Science.* We do not yet have a new, formal A9 proposal (unlike the case with Computer Science), so these are tentative. We will update when we get official proposals.

  • The Department of Psychology will be removed from the proposed School of Social Sciences and allowed to form a School of Psychological and Behavioral Sciences, to be housed in a proposed College of Health and Human Sciences. Faculty currently in Psychology would be joined by faculty in behavior analysis and therapy.
  • The Department of Technology will become a School of Technology in the (renamed) College of Science, Engineering, Technology, and Transportation (STTEM!).

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Restructuring update: Computer Science

The administration today (1/24) shared with the FA a new Article 9 proposal for a School of Computing. It basically calls for the current Department of Computer Science to be rechristened as a School of Computing. The proposal only affects faculty in Computer Science.

The proposal suggests that the tentative new name for the college will be College of Science, Technology, Transportation, Engineering and Math (no doubt looking for STTEM as the acronym). This also suggests that Transportation may be split off from the proposed School of Transportation and Applied Science.

Program Change Proposal – School of Computing.pdf

 

The Chancellor on WSIU

I (Dave J) rather belatedly listened to the Chancellor’s interview with Jennifer Fuller, done on January 9. He said some interesting things about tapestries and buckets, among other things. A summary with commentary is available after the break.

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Restructuring votes

Last update: Saturday 1/27.

This post, which will be updated as new results reach us, will list votes and “straw poll” results regarding the Article 9 approval process.

Please send additions and corrections to Dave Johnson. Corrections will be noted at the bottom.

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Restructuring update

There’s been lots of discussion of various possible changes to the second version of the chancellor’s reorganization plan. Thus far we have only heard tell of three changes that have been fully approved by the chancellor:

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FA News (1/18/2018): Make your vote count

Dear colleagues,

Welcome back for the spring semester. Let me start this message by thanking Debbie Bruns, who has volunteered to serve as FA Secretary for the remainder of Rachel Stocking’s term (Rachel retired in December). The FA depends on work by faculty volunteers, and we’re most thankful to Debbie for her willingness to serve in this important role.

Grievance update Read more of this post

FA News (12/27/2017): A9 grievances

Dear colleagues,
 
My apologies for intruding over the break, but I promised an update on grievances regarding Article 9 and can now bring you up to speed. 
 
On Friday, December 22, the Faculty Association filed grievances with the administration regarding the chancellor’s restructuring proposals. 
 
In our view the administration has violated Article 9 in three respects. 
1. The administration failed to involve Faculty in each of the affected units in the development of proposals (I here use the convention in which the capitalized ‘Faculty’ refers to faculty represented by the FA–tenure-track and tenured faculty outside of law and medicine);
 
2. The proposals distributed to Faculty on November 13 failed to meet the contractual requirements for proposals, as they did not address the specific circumstances of each proposed school; 
 
3. The administration failed, until December 20, to identify the appropriate administrator to oversee the proposal distribution and review process. 

FA News (12/19/2017): BOT and restructuring

Dear colleagues, 

I devote this newsletter to commentary on the SIU Board of Trustees meetings on Wednesday and Thursday of last week (December 13 and 14). This commentary will make for a long email, and I cannot even promise that this is our last newsletter before the end of the year: we will report back soon on the grievance about Article 9 we are in the process of finalizing. (If you are interested in joining that grievance, please let me know). But the meetings of last week were vital, perhaps even a turning point; and no one doubts the importance of the current debate for the future of SIUC. 

At the bottom you can find some links news coverage and other items, including the infamous Camaro & Yugo slide show.

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FA News (12/11/17): Updates

A number of important announcements as we near the end of the semester.

1. The Board of Trustees comes to Carbondale

The chancellor’s restructuring proposal has proven to be nothing if not controversial. The SIU administration and Board of Trustees have received numerous letters from faculty, students, professional groups, and alumni, and have learned of votes taken in opposition to the proposed elimination of academic departments by the SIUC Faculty Senate, Graduate Council, Undergraduate Student Government, and Graduate and Professional Student Council. The last has not only voted to oppose elimination of departments, but to censure the chancellor for his unwillingness to consult with the GPSC, his treatment of GPSC representatives, and his attitude toward graduate education.

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FA News (12/2/2017): A9 guide

Here’s the latest newsletter, featuring a guide to the Article 9 process.

Dear colleagues,
 
Here you’ll find an FA Guide to the Article 9 process.  My apologies for sending it out on Saturday morning–especially as our VP, Segun Ojewuyi, just sent you a message about an IEA election next week. But there is a great deal of confusion on campus, and we wanted to get this sent out as soon as it was ready. A great deal of confusion was inevitable given the decision to try to push changes of this magnitude through all at once, as quickly as possible, at this point in the year. We hope our guide will limit the confusion. 
 
I will highlight a couple of points.
 

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